Glenda Parks


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Windy Field

Original free pieced design by Glenda Parks

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Free motion quilting by Chris Ballard

http://quilting4u.blogspot.com


19.5" wide by 16.25" long - Shown here before quilting
Photo will supersize if double-clicked

Glenda writes:

My idea was that the barn would be red.

I really like that Julie talked through
the fabric selection with choices and
the idea to fold and lay possible fabrics in place.

I chose my greens thinking about early summer
and since red and black go together so well,
I used black for the roof.

I added a small pond in the barnyard and
the scene HAD to include a free pieced windmill.

When Julie was building the barns for See Rock City,
I envisioned them to be smaller than they really are,
so understanding that my barn would be ‘larger’
helped me worry less as I was working.


Shown here after quilting - Photo will supersize if double-clicked

DESIGN NOTE:

Instead of an image or text,
Glenda chose to use a piece of contrasting
horizontally-striped fabric for her haymow's signage/opening.

She also used a scrap of watery blue for the barnyard’s pond.

Be sure to look carefully at her wonderful free pieced windmill.


QUILTING NOTE:

Small swirls unify the barnyard’s greens,
gentle curves create ripples in the pond,
carefully placed straight lines add definition to the barn,
and whimsical stitching fills the sky.



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Crow Morning

Original free pieced design by Glenda Parks
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Free motion quilting by Chris Ballard

http://quilting4u.blogspot.com


20" wide x 16.5" long - Shown here before quilting
Photo will supersize if double-clicked


Glenda writes:

Since piecing Windy Fields,
I have pieced and tossed two barns.

While looking at barn photos on Pinterest,
I realized I could combine the old barn look,
a barn quilt, and the modern quilting colors that I love.

The people who own this barn keep bees –
albeit, floating beehives, but the crows on the fence don’t seem to mind.

The crows have an interesting history.

My mother was an accomplished dressmaker.

In her late 50s and in the early stages of Alzheimer’s,
she decided she would start quilting.

She never made a quilt but collected fabric, magazines, and patterns
which have been assimilated into my stash.

Her crow fabric has always been a standout favorite of mine
and I have often added it to a pile of potential fabrics for a piece I am working on,
but have always taken it out of the mix in order to keep it close.

For some unknown reason, it NEEDED to be in this barn block.


Shown here after quilting - Photo will supersize if double-clicked


DESIGN NOTE:

Take time to listen to your creative voice
and honor that part of yourself in your work.


QUILTING NOTE:

Stitching adds interest to the haymow’s barn quilt and fences.

It also adds visual interest to the barn’s wood grain siding and brick foundation.

The glorious early-morning sky speaks for itself.

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Glen's SSSOBB BLOG HOP POSTS

Her first blog hop post is HERE

Her second blog hop post is HERE

Her third blog hop post is HERE

Her fourth blog hop post is HERE

And the fifth post is HERE.


1 comment:

  1. These are gorgeous, Glenda. I'm especially drawn to the crows. I love that you got a chance to use your mom's crow fabric for such a unique piece.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so much for taking time to share your thoughts!