Monday, June 19, 2017

Marlene's Peach Farm Barn



Marlene was one of my students at The Folk School last April.

Due to outside commitments,
she had to miss two days of class
so she took her partially-constructed second barn
home and worked on it during the evenings.

When she returned for our final half-day session,
she was unhappy about the way her barn's upper story
didn't line up correctly necessitating the chopping-off of her 
marvelous (small!) pieced haymow sign block.




I kept thinking about her dilemma as we drove home,
completely understanding her disappointment with the finished block.

Except - was it really finished?

The next day I called her and suggested that she unstitch a few seams
so she could remove the chopped off segment
and replace it with something else before re-assembling the block.




Just recently she sent me this late-at-night photo
of her newly updated barn block.

Well done, Marlene!

I love your bold winter barn under that fabulous night sky.


* * *

Note to all free piecers:

You are  never really done until you are happy with the results.

You can ALWAYS take it apart and make changes
so that you are happy with your work.

Be brave - take it out and do it over!

Sunday, June 11, 2017

See Rock City Visits New Hampshire


Photo by Lynne Tyler


SEE ROCK CITY is currently on display 
at Quilted Threads in Henniker, New Hampshire.

Lynne Tyler teaches there on a regular basis.

Yesterday she taught a free pieced barn class.

She also took SEE ROCK CITY outdoors
to get some on-location beauty shots.

She took some fabulous photos!

CLICK HERE to see for yourself!



Monday, June 5, 2017

Wendy's Wonderful Barn



Wendy's haymow sign began like this.




A week or so after class,
she showed me her additional progress on the sky.

We also talked about options to finish out her block.




The next week, she shared this!


Be sure to double click so you can appreciate the details
like her flower farm sign on the barn
(ready to be hand appliqu├ęd in place)
and the flower cart on the path through the fields of blooms.

This was Wendy's first ever free pieced barn.

I think it is splendid!!



Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Cherie's Illinois Barn



SSOBB Member Cherie Moore
shared this Illinois pole barn
during the SSOBB blog hop last year.

CLICK HERE to read her post about its construction.




When I taught at The Folk School earlier this year,
Cherie sent me her pole barn block
so I could share it with my students.

Of course, I took a few detail photos
while it was in my studio.




Cherie is known for her wonderful use of thrifted shirtings
and this barn is a terrific example of her work.




I especially like the way she added the top on her silo.



If you ever wonder whether small details make a difference,
just look at the impact of that narrow inserted strip above her barn door
and the very narrow inserted strip along the barn's roof lines.

The answer is YES - little details DO make a big difference.






Monday, May 22, 2017

Kathryn's Beautiful Barn



You will definitely want to double click on this photo
to supersize it so you can enjoy the details.

Kathryn was one of the students in 
my recent local barn building class.

Like many quilters, she was concerned
about the liberated nature of free piecing
since she prefers points that match
and blocks that are symmetrical.

Happily she discovered that free pieced barns
can be liberated and symmetrical at the same time.

I think her barn is gorgeous.

Congratulations, Kathryn!

Monday, May 15, 2017

Lynne's Red Barn Block


This is the second barn block that Lynne loaned
to me for use in two recent classes.

The red Weare barn block measures 25" tall x 31" wide.

If you double click the photo, it will supersize.




I love how she pieced the floodlight.




Just look at the tiny details she pieced into the barn doors and windows.




Fabric choices really do matter.





Thank you Lynne for sharing your barns with my students!

Monday, May 8, 2017

Lynne's Green Barn Block

Approx. 32" tall x 36" wide

hanging on my design wall - double clicking will supersize the photo.

That large leafy print in the background
does such a good job of setting the barn
into its heavily wooded surroundings.




Before I sent it home,
I took a couple of detail photos
to show you how each small decision
impacts the overall free pieced result.

Look at the window above the blue barn door.

See how she used two fabrics to indicate broken window panes?

And look at the framing for the small window
in the barn's peak.




She used three fabrics to create the light pole,
each adding texture and dimension.

Subtle but oh so effective.